Motorola finally launched the much-hyped Moto Razr on the 6th of February after originally announcing the handset last November. It has merely been a week since the device hit retail stores and the display units being showcased are already showing issues.

The issues are mainly on the display and the hinge equipped with “movable support plates that rigidly support the display when the phone is open but collapse out of the way when the phone is closed”.

Since the display is not completely attached to the phone, there are more chances for dust and lint to get underneath the display. Once minute particles get behind the handset’s display, it is more likely to cause damage to the handset sooner rather than later. This is evident in the durability test of Moto Razr by popular YouTuber JerryRigEverything.

Also, as we see in CNET’s fold test, the Moto Razr miserably failed to match the expected number of folds. The device stopped functioning after 27,000 folds. Samsung Galaxy Fold, on the other hand, survived 120,000 folds before finally becoming nonfunctional.

In response to CNET’s test, Motorola issued a statement saying “razr is a unique smartphone, featuring a dynamic clamshell folding system unlike any device on the market. SquareTrade’s FoldBot is simply not designed to test our device. […] razr underwent extensive cycle endurance testing during product development, and CNET’s test is not indicative of what consumers will experience when using razr in the real-world.”

Motorola recently published a support video titled “Caring for Razr” with recommendations to keep the device in its “iconic condition”. The video recommends potential Moto Razr buyers to wipe the phone with a dry cloth if it gets wet.

Users should keep sharp objects away from the device and should not apply screen protectors on the phone’s display. It also warns users to keep the device closed before placing it in the pocket or purse.

After witnessing all these disappointing results, we would recommend you to think twice before purchasing the Moto Razr, especially taking the extreme care you would need to protect your $1,499 handset into consideration.

There is no word on the Indian launch timeline so far. However, having witnessed the ‘Made in India’ variant of the Moto Razr earlier in January, I hope we can expect an official announcement in the coming months.

VIAArs Technica

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