In a vast market with hundreds of companies and their brand names, distinguishing the products by their brands can become a bit problematic for the general consumers. So, companies always try to keep their image inside the consumer’s mind through their unique logos and text designs. Similarly, Apple is will also not support the fact if some other company uses a logo that is closely similar to the Cupertino giants’. So now, the company has filed a complaint against another company for using an Apple-like logo.

A recipe management app called “Prepear” is currently using a cartoonish representation of a pear for its logo. And it completely makes sense as I am sure you have noticed it by now, there is “pear” in “Prepear”.

However, according to recent reports, Apple has filed a “notice of opposition” against “Prepear” for using the logo. According to Apple, the logo of the pear is notably similar to its own logo (which is, of course, a bitten apple) and might “cause dilution of the distinctiveness” for the consumers. And as it is similar to their logo, it violates the Lanham Act, which prevents companies to use logos similar to existing trademarked logos.

The iPhone-makers claim that Prepear’s “minimalistic fruit design with a right-angled leaf” might rapidly bring Apple’s name in the minds of the consumers when they see it.

“The Apple Marks are so famous and instantly recognizable that the similarities in Applicant’s Mark will overshadow any differences and cause the ordinary consumer to believe the Applicant is related to, affiliated with or endorsed by Apple.”, adds the court filing by Apple.

Apple also adds that as the app is food/recipe-based, it is much closer to “Apple’s natural zone of expansion for Apple’s Apple Marks.” In simpler words, as Apple already has “services related to computer software, as well as healthcare, nutrition, general wellness, and social networking”, a food/recipe service is very much within their domain of expansion.

After the court filing, several executives of “Prepear” have taken their concerns to social media. For instance, co-founder of Prepear, Natalie Monson recently shared a post on her Instagram handle, requesting help from her Instagram friends save their “small business” from the trillion-dollar company.

Another founding member, Russell Monson, has started a petition on change.org with the title “Save the Pear from Apple! End Apple’s Aggressive Opposition of Businesses with Fruit Logos”.

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